When it’s not even 90 in Wisconsin…

“Print is predictable and impersonal, conveying information in a mechanical transaction with the reader’s eye. Handwriting, by contrast, resists the eye, reveals its meaning slowly, and is as intimate as skin.”
—  Ruth Ozeki, A Tale for the Time Being (via wordsnquotes)

(via bschmidt)

toopaletofunction:

staythatswhatimeanttosay:

One nation, under Canada, above Mexico.

with liberty and justice for some 

(via kaaaatiiiiieeee)

livefrommyhouse:

"That will include, snack, music, and jewelry areas."

(inspired by x)

(via velocipedestrienne)

residentgoodgirl:

If a guy tells you he’s an asshole, he is an asshole 100% of the time. Do not try to prove him wrong.

(via a-song-about-a-bad-girl)

scarlettblythe:

This might be the most influential quote of the whole series.

(via bschmidt)

abedder:

RIP you glorious, glorious lady.

(via bschmidt)

todaysdocument:

Thomas Jefferson’s Account of the Storming of the Bastille, 225 Years ago:

“…in that instant a discharge from the Bastille killed 4 people of those nearest to the deputies. The deputies retired, the people rushed against the place, and almost in an instant were in possession of a fortification, defended by 100 men, of infinite strength, which in other times had stood several regular sieges & had never been taken.”

Letter from Thomas Jefferson, U.S. Minister to France, to John Jay, Secretary of Foreign Affairs, July 19, 1789, reporting on the events in Paris, (page 538)

From the file unit:  Letters from Thomas Jefferson, 1785 - 1789

Appointed U.S. Minister to France in 1785, Thomas Jefferson was in Paris in July 1789 when the French people rose up against their rulers and the first blood was shed in the opening days of the French Revolution. In his letter to Secretary of Foreign Affairs John Jay, Jefferson recounts how a mob stormed the Bastille, took the stash of arms, freed the prisoners, and seized the “Governor” of the Bastille who was then killed and beheaded in the city streets on July 14, 1789.

via Eyewitness: Thomas Jefferson - Onset of the French Revolution, 1789